Palm trees blowing in heavy wind and heavy waves during storm

Hurricane

A Hurricane is a tropical cyclone or localized, low-pressure weather system that has organized thunderstorms but no front (a boundary separating two air masses of different densities) and maximum sustained winds of at least 74 mph.

In the National Risk Index, a Hurricane Risk Index score and rating represent a community's relative risk for Hurricanes when compared to the rest of the United States. A Hurricane Expected Annual Loss score and rating represent a community's relative level of expected building and population loss each year due to Hurricanes when compared to the rest of the United States.

A map of the United States colored by Hurricane Risk Index ratings. Hurricane risk is possible along the East Coast and Gulf Coast, and is most prevalent in Florida, North Carolina, and along the Gulf Coast. For full results, see the National Risk Index Map webpage.

Hurricane Exposure

A Hurricane exposure value represents a community's building value (in dollars) and population (in both people and population equivalence) exposed to Hurricanes.

Hurricane Annualized Frequency

A Hurricane annualized frequency value represents the average number of recorded Hurricane hazard occurrences (events) per year over the period of record (167.11 years for the Atlantic Basin and 69.04 years for the Pacific Basin).

Hurricane Historic Loss Ratio

A Hurricane historic loss ratio is the representative percentage of the exposed consequence type value (building or population) expected to be lost due to a Hurricane hazard occurrence.

Hurricane Processing Methodology

For comprehensive details about the Hurricane processing methodology, see the National Risk Index Technical Documentation.